Eat. hos·pi·tal·i·ty ˌhäspəˈtalədē/ - Google - the Maître d's secret tool

Hospitality is defined as, the friendly and generous reception and entertainment of guests, visitors, or strangers.  According to Grub Street, today's Maître d's use Google to find out all about you before you arrive at the restaurant in an attempt to garner little details about you that they can then manipulate to provide “better” service.  Not only will they be able to greet you upon arrival based on your Facebook image, but now they can even pair you with a server that looks just like your girlfriend from high school (interesting, it might just be your girlfriend from high school, creepy).  They can also use this information to develop their seating plan for the evening, which can work for you, or more then likely, against you.  In the past, restaurants employed little black books with names and details about PX’s (VIP clients).  With the advent of Open Table, came the automated system that allowed, and continues to allow, restaurants to keep a running tab on each and every guest that enters their establishment – favorite table, average spend and tipping habits perhaps.  With the recent purchase of Open Table by Priceline, we can now expect even more tech integration into our dining service – you no longer have to wait for the check to arrive, just pull out your smart phone launch Pay from Open Table and presto, you are now the cashier; handling the transaction for your $500 dinner yourself, priceless.  So my question for everyone, if you (social media and your smart phone) provide much of the service and nuance when dining, shouldn’t hospitality be re-defined as:  the invasive and expected reception and entertainment of guests, visitors, or other “known” individuals through a combination of employed service and self service methods? To be continued…